Posts

The Real Highlight of the Golden Globes

… Wasn't Sacha Baron Cohen's memoir of man-Bagatov love, but the look on Zach Braff's face when he lost for Best Actor in a Comedy Series. By the time you read this, Braff will have blogged about how his feelings … Read More

By / January 16, 2007

… Wasn't Sacha Baron Cohen's memoir of man-Bagatov love, but the look on Zach Braff's face when he lost for Best Actor in a Comedy Series. By the time you read this, Braff will have blogged about how his feelings of apathy and disassociation at that moment of defeat should be experienced collectively by Generation Y, preferably with the Decembrists playing in the background. And that pseudo-smug leer he aimed at the camera during the nominees call not only instantaneously burned up the pseudo but warrants a link to Josh Levin's Slate piece on why the lead Scrub is, in fact, a category A tool:

What has Braff's keen ear picked up about the nation's young people? If Garden State is to be believed, they spend their days squinting and staring wistfully while slowly learning that it's OK to feel and, like, live. When they do speak, yearbook quotes come out. For example: "Maybe that's all family really is. A group of people who miss the same imaginary place." In The Last Kiss, Braff furrows his brow solemnly and ponders a question that's paralyzed millions: Should I replace my incredibly hot girlfriend with an incredibly hot college student? This time, OC starlet Rachel Bilson gets the Ferris Bueller-esque pearl of wisdom: "The world is moving so fast now that we start freaking out way before our parents did because we don't ever stop to breathe anymore." Never has the voice of a generation had so little of substance to say.

Tagged with: