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The Dark Side of Camelot

It's a shame Arthur Schlesinger is gone. I'd have had a turducken party to see how he'd handle these late-confirmed revelations about his hero: The degree to which senior officials were involved in authorizing the spying is powerfully evident in … Read More

By / June 28, 2007

It's a shame Arthur Schlesinger is gone. I'd have had a turducken party to see how he'd handle these late-confirmed revelations about his hero:

The degree to which senior officials were involved in authorizing the spying is powerfully evident in tape recordings of White House meetings led by President John F. Kennedy on Aug. 1, 1962, and Aug. 22, 1962. In the first session, Kennedy approves a plan proposed by two advisers, James R. Killian Jr. and Clark Clifford, to establish a special investigative group to spy on reporters. In the later meeting, Kennedy presses the director of central intelligence, John McCone, and Gen. Maxwell Taylor to update him on planning for the spy unit. In both meetings, Kennedy endorses the idea.

Courtesy of the CIA's "Family Jewels." Izzy Stone said it best (and I paraphrase and conflate here): All governments lie, but they also on occasion tell themselves the truth.

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