Posts

The Great Exit Interview

The scene: A crowded train to NYC. In the café car, we’re chatting with the Professional Development Director of a prestigious law firm with offices in North America, Europe and Asia. "I love my job," she says. "It’s up to … Read More

By / November 13, 2008

The scene: A crowded train to NYC. In the café car, we’re chatting with the Professional Development Director of a prestigious law firm with offices in North America, Europe and Asia.

"I love my job," she says. "It’s up to me to shape successful careers, from associate to partner. " For every attorney, she creates a package of skills training, mentoring, networking, and coaching. 

When we ask about the status of women, she says that flexible work arrangements and paid parental leave (for mothers and fathers) have been in place for at least a decade. Several women partners have small children and work part-time.

"This is a wonderful place to work. We want people to feel really good about the firm. Even if they decide to leave, our goal is a great exit interview."

A great exit interview?

"When our lawyers leave, they go into the government or corporations. We see everyone who leaves as a new client, a potential source of revenue."

So, our new goal for the Jewish community? Great exit interviews!

Let’s create workplaces that are so committed to excellence that professionals benefit from career pathways, starting on Day One. Let’s advocate for policies that support young women and men at every stage in the life cycle. Let’s encourage people to advance into leadership, and if there’s no room at the top of your organization, let’s help them go to another organization to get the stretch they need.

If we transform our workplaces, we will be rewarded with more talented applicants, better productivity, and lower rates of turnover. Some of these high potential professionals may leave, temporarily or permanently, to fulfill their aspirations.

These people may return – as colleagues, volunteers, Board members, or contributors. If we can see each Jewish organization as part of dynamic, interdependent communities, then we will make sure that each professional gives a great exit interview, and feels connected no matter where they work.

Want to learn how?  Look here.

Shifra Bronznick and Didi Goldenhar co-authors of Leveling the Playing Field: Advancing Women in Jewish Organizational Life, are guest blogging on Jewcy this week with their co-author Marty Linsky. Stay tuned.

 

Tagged with: