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Face Lifts are So Last Century. Try a Skull Lift, Instead.

When it comes to the ever-growing beauty industry, there are three main categories: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Today's news touches on all three, and includes some delightful–and some downright frightful–forecasts, trends and products. London's Daily Telegraph serves … Read More

By / January 23, 2008

When it comes to the ever-growing beauty industry, there are three main categories: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Today's news touches on all three, and includes some delightful–and some downright frightful–forecasts, trends and products.

  • London's Daily Telegraph serves up a report on the future of face lifts, which aren't actually face lifts at all: Having discovered that the bones of our face lose volume as we age, researchers at Duke University are looking into the possibilities of "arresting" the natural loss of bone through an injection. Also on the horizon: High-speed cooling technology that promises to do away with wrinkles, "natural" breast implants that will harvest fat from other parts of the patient's body, and stem-cell injections.
  • Wired reports on a new skin gel that seems to legitimately help reduce scarring, unlike a lot of the under-performers currently on the market. The only problem is that it might also reduce the "number of infection-fighting macrophages, which could make the gel-treated wounds susceptible to bacteria."
  • The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery says that nearly 9,000 lip augmentation procedures were performed in the U.S. in 2007.
  • British news rag The Guardian has a couple of tasty tidbits on emerging surgery crazes. Apparently "New York surgeons and dermatologists are reporting an increase in the number of women having earlobe procedures." That's right: Ear lobe jobs. Meanwhile, "undo-plasty" is growing in popularity. It's what we're calling any procedure that seeks to "correct the unnecessary operations they had in the first place."
  • Which brings us to the cautionary tale of Jocelyn Wildenstein, who teaches that chasing the dragon of youth can get you burned.
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