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Afternoon News Roundup

A Peace of Bush President Bush, visiting Ramallah, declared that “painful political concessions” are inevitable for both Israelis and Palestinians (including the question of Jerusalem and an end to “occupation”) in order to create a two-state solution.  Kerry’s Call He’s … Read More

By / January 10, 2008

A Peace of Bush President Bush, visiting Ramallah, declared that “painful political concessions” are inevitable for both Israelis and Palestinians (including the question of Jerusalem and an end to “occupation”) in order to create a two-state solution. 

Kerry’s Call He’s with Obama. No props for his former running-mate and no regard for the Clinton election machine. Paglia The lovely and wonderful Camille takes aim at Hillary, American foreign policy, and Robert Plant’s lyrics on “Stairway to Heaven.”

The Death of High Fidelity Rolling Stone covers one of the fundamental (and unfortunately neglected) problems of modern music: it sounds shitty. And I’m not just talking about Fergie. On the topic of the music marketplace, Trent Reznor examines how vulgar and ethically bankrupt the consumers are (and they’re the good guys compared to the scumbags at the RIAA) when it comes to compensating artists. And in yet another broadside against post-colonialist excess, Marc Geelhoad says Edward Said’s music criticism sucks.

The Suicide of Reason Ayaan Hirsi Ali reviews Lee Harris’ The Suicide of Reason. She endorses his diagnosis of Islamic culture, but balks at his pessimism and belief in social Darwinism (that the fierce East will destroy the complacent West). Along the way she tries to contrast the “American Individualism” with Europe’s “Hegelian Statism” and hopes that the Enlightenment will save us. History professor at the University of Glasgow, Colin Kidd, has an interesting, indirect response to some of Ali’s broader ideological goals in the form of an exploration of some of the consequences of the Enlightenment on the development of race relations in the West.

Public Intellectuals and Insularity Russell Jacoby revisits his thesis on the death of the public intellectual because of the research university’s insistence on intra-disciplinary specialization. But these high-profile intellectuals are still at work outside the academy: Stanley Fish on why the humanities won’t save us (but that’s why they’re important); Slavoj Zizek’s latest political fever-dream praises Robespierre, incites a vicious rebuke from Simon Critchley, and may simply be playing around in front of the gaze of others; and Harvey C. Mansfield snipes at economists.

And Just So This Is Clear: I Drink Your Milkshake Is it catchy or preposterous? And can this frantic line from P.T. Anderson’s There Will Be Blood (AKA Moby Dick In Marfa) get the herd to sit through this brilliant flick? 

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