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Afternoon News Roundup

The Game is Real Set your TiVos: The Wire, one of the finest works of American art ever created, returns to HBO for its final season. Mark Bowden calls the show's fountainhead, David Simon, the angriest man in television and … Read More

By / January 4, 2008

The Game is Real Set your TiVos: The Wire, one of the finest works of American art ever created, returns to HBO for its final season. Mark Bowden calls the show's fountainhead, David Simon, the angriest man in television and attempts to dissect the The Wire's social fatalism (which he dismisses as too bleak and Dickensian) and Simon’s own personal grudges against institutions and individuals. The essay, and the many bloggers who have responded to it, want to resist the nihilistic logic of the show, but can’t deny its power or coherence. They can only claim that The Wire is too coherent and pessimistic to actually be “real.” Watch and see for yourself. The Future of Populism Now that Awwww-Shucks and Edwards made strong showings in Iowa, an issue that becomes important is whether their populism can be adapted and exported to more states and still whether they will still be viable candidates. Jonathan Chait explains Huck’s personal, yet contradictory, commitments to a message for “the folks.” John Nichols at The Nation juxtaposes Edwards’ “edgier populism” with the “soft promise” of Obama. It May Be the Economy, Stupid Stocks closed down again. This time the bad news is attributed to a rise in unemployment. "I'm looking for something that says ‘Dad likes leather.’" Dr. Tobias Fünke was only a few seasons away from his (latent) dream of becoming a “Leather Daddy.” Biker chic is in. 50 Worst People in America, 2007 Edition The Beast makes it clear who should burn in hell and their guide is completed with suggestions for how they ought to get there. Before Awards Can Ruin Them Here’s what the Village Voice came up with as the best feature films of 2007 (including a very English-speaking top-10 list from J. Hoberman). Meanwhile, over at Slate, their movie club kicks around the Coen Brothers, spits on the grave of Ingmar Bergman, and talks about which abortion movies from 2007 must be seen (hint: Cristian Mungiu’s 4 Months, 3 Weeks, 2 Days is the easy winner there.) A History of Histories Over at the Telegraph, John Adamson and Tom Holland review John Burrow’s recent addition to the field of historiography.

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