Religion & Beliefs

Shalom TV

Yet again I direct you over to the Washington Post, where they’re featuring an article on faith based cable channels, including a new Jewish channel, Shalom TV. A kosher cook-off, hip-hop entertainer Russell Simmons discussing anti-Semitism, Hebrew lessons, Talmud study … Read More

By / June 14, 2007

Yet again I direct you over to the Washington Post, where they’re featuring an article on faith based cable channels, including a new Jewish channel, Shalom TV.

A kosher cook-off, hip-hop entertainer Russell Simmons discussing anti-Semitism, Hebrew lessons, Talmud study and the "Jewish Mr. Rogers."

They're all part of the lineup on Shalom TV, a Jewish-oriented cable television channel that expanded last month into the Washington-Baltimore region, its second market.

Shalom TV, which recently expanded into the area, has a wide array of Jewish programming, including kids' show "Agent Emes," above. (ShalomTV.org)

The channel is the latest outgrowth of the burgeoning religion-oriented cable and satellite television business, which has spread beyond its evangelical Christian roots into what the industry calls "faith and values programming" that includes other faiths and cultures.


Shalom TV is also aiming at a broader audience by offering cultural, social and religious programming.

"What Shalom TV is doing is really trying to feature the entire panorama of Jewish life, of which Judaism is an element, but it is only one element," said Rabbi Mark Golub, president and chief executive of the Fort Lee, N.J.-based channel, which started last year in the Philadelphia-Delaware area. "We are not a religion channel in the classical sense of that term."

The subscription-based, video-on-demand channel, available on Comcast, shows religious offerings, such as a series on Kabbalah, the Jewish mystical tradition, as well as Talmud study. But it also offers movies, celebrity kibitzer Arlene Peck, step-by-step Hebrew lessons and the finals of "The Simply Manischewitz Cook-Off" (winning entree: sweet-potato-encrusted chicken). It touts its children's show "Mr. Bookstein's Store" as the "Jewish Mr. Rogers."

"Most people don't imagine this when you tell them you're doing Jewish television," Golub said.

Full Story Am I the only one who’s depressed that Jews have joined the ranks of those who get in touch with God via the cable company?