Religion & Beliefs

Religion and politics

In light of recent events (little things like Rumsfeld, the gay-pride parade in Jerusalem, and of course the elections), it seems worthwhile to spend some time thinking about how our faith drives our political agenda… or doesn't.  And maybe how … Read More

By / November 9, 2006

In light of recent events (little things like Rumsfeld, the gay-pride parade in Jerusalem, and of course the elections), it seems worthwhile to spend some time thinking about how our faith drives our political agenda… or doesn't.  And maybe how our politics drive our relationship to faith.

 There's an interesting dialogue at Haaretz this week, a back-and-forth between David Saperstein (Director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism) and a bunch of freaks (which is often the case at this particular blog) who say things like this:

Doesn't Reform Judaism's universalism and broad progressivism prioritise a vague upper-middle class progressivism over Jewish issues?

Which is funny to me, since I'm a broadly progressive universal kind of Jew. Interesting, how we each think "Jewish" is an adjective that describes our own particular world.

Especially interesting for me is that Saperstein offers numbers on how Jews vote, (religious and secular).  Also that he addresses directly HOW our Judaism affects (or should, anyway) our relationship to the political world.

 Check it.