Religion & Beliefs

National Day of Unplugging: Shabbos is all the Rage

I’m sitting here at my desk.  In front of me is one telephone, one iPhone, a cup of coffee, and two computer screens.  One screen has my Tweetdeck on it, and the other, well, I’m using it to write this.  … Read More

By / March 19, 2010

I’m sitting here at my desk.  In front of me is one telephone, one iPhone, a cup of coffee, and two computer screens.  One screen has my Tweetdeck on it, and the other, well, I’m using it to write this.  Monday through Friday, I work from about 9:30 AM till about 6:30 PM.  I leave the office, and if I don’t go to Whole Foods, I usually go home, sit down on my couch and pop open my Netbook, because I get this feeling that there was either something I didn’t finish at the office, or because like Bob Dylan, I too have a "head full of ideas" that drives me insane; I want to work on another project or finish a piece of fiction.  This lust to stay connected never seems to end, and really I’m not complaining about it — too much. Tonight, I’ll want to know if there are any more NCAA upsets, and even though I want to know who all my friends on Twitter think is the greatest band playing at SXSW, I’m going to let it go until Saturday night, because I like this idea of a National Day of Unplugging as part of The Sabbath Manifesto.  As someone who’s used the excuse of "I don’t have time for Shabbos" when asked why I don’t take part in one of my peoples greatest ideas, I have to admit that I’m sold on The Sabbath Manifesto. While I cherish and respect all the rituals involved with observing the Sabbath, this simple message of unplugging, relaxing, and unwinding, seems a lot more my style than lighting candles and saying prayers (but the drinking wine thing is always up my alley).  And who knows?  Maybe if I like this enough, we can make it a regular thing?