Jewish Food

The Boozy Jew: Winding Down the Summer With Rosé

We are in the dying weeks of the summer and sitting here at my desk with a viewof the world outside, all I can think of is rosé .  Yeah yeah I know, Rosé is “so hot right now” and … Read More

By / August 31, 2010

We are in the dying weeks of the summer and sitting here at my desk with a viewof the world outside, all I can think of is rosé .  Yeah yeah I know, Rosé is “so hot right now” and some of you might be thinking, wow, second column and already he’s writing about wussy beverages, but seriously, Rosé might just change your life.

First a very important point: White Zinfandel is not rosé, and rosé is not White Zinfandel.  If you are thinking of the pink wine your Bubbe used to drink and maybe even put an ice cube in, get that memory out of your head immediately.  Yes, they are both pink, but the similarities end there.  Rosé is a complex wine that has been around for centuries, White Zinfandel was created in the 1970′s by the California mass wine industry for our Bubbies.

Rosé was actually first made in the Champagne region of France, before the winemakers there started making another type of wine for which they have become more famous — supplying rap stars and the Jews that represent them.

Rosé gets its lovely pink color one of two ways in the wine making process: the first and most common is by taking red grapes that have been crushed and allowing those grape’s skins to come in contact with the juice for a very short time, which is known as maceration; allowing some of the red color from the skins to dye the juice, leaving a pink hue behind.  See here’s the thing, when wine is made, if the juice from the crushed grapes is not allowed to macerate with their skins, the wine will be white — meaning even a red grape can make white wine. The second way rose is made is by Saignée, or bleeding the vats. When a winemaker desires to impart more tannin and color to a red wine, some of the pink juice from the must can be removed at an early stage. The red wine remaining in the vats is intensified as a result of the bleeding, because the volume of juice in the must is reduced, and the must involved in the maceration is concentrated. The pink juice that is removed can be fermented separately to produce rosé.

Rose is perfect when it’s hot out.  Picnics, grilling, or just hanging out with friends.  It truly is the perfect beverage of summer.  Rose is meant to be drunk young, this is a wine you buy and pop the day you buy it, or maybe a few bottles.  Enjoy.  Below are some of my favorites:

Savia Viva Rosado – 2009 Rosé, Spain, Penedès

Cerasuolo Montepulciano, Làmina – 2009 Rosé, Italy, Abruzzi

Dom. Triennes Rosé – 2009 Rosé, France, Vin de Pays

Shinn Estates Rose – North Fork, Long Island

Brooklyn Oenology Rose – Brooklyn, NY