Arts & Culture

A Personal History of Jewish Reading

  Were someone to ask me what I do for a living, I’d respond: I’m a reader. Yet, I write books (maybe I write too many books), and by profession and sustenance, I’m a writer: I create stories, I reflect … Read More

By / September 2, 2008

 

Were someone to ask me what I do for a living, I’d respond: I’m a reader. Yet, I write books (maybe I write too many books), and by profession and sustenance, I’m a writer: I create stories, I reflect on ideas political and aesthetical in essays, and I travel to distant places in order to describe them in sentences.

Still, I can’t think of a more onerous profession than reading. I’m far less satisfied with my career as a writer than with my abundant, sustained career as a reader. In fact, I decided I wanted to write because I wanted to own a sentence, a paragraph, a page, to make them my own: to imitate the way the masters, my teachers, succeeded in appropriating the world through words.

One single word, one alone, the right word, is capable of changing the world. I want to partake in that word!