Arts & Culture

Netanya Fish Fry

She's dead, now, but I can still hear her speaking as though she were right next to me. "All they ever want to see or hear is something about the fucking Occupation." I could sympathize with my friend, standing next … Read More

By / June 4, 2008

She's dead, now, but I can still hear her speaking as though she were right next to me. "All they ever want to see or hear is something about the fucking Occupation." I could sympathize with my friend, standing next to her one hot summer afternoon, in front of her house near Kikar Hamedinah. If only they could stop expecting it of us. If only we could stop producing it ourselves. If only, I remember thinking on the drive home that night, it didn't need to be written about at all.

That was nine years ago. Yet, for the past year, I cannot help but hear Naomi's words again. Writing on the controversy over the selection of Beaufort for an Oscar over The Band's Visit, Tom Tugend indicated his preference for The Band 's Visit because he found it so much happier than Joseph Cedar's noir, anti-war drama.

Reprising the theme yet again in a review of Etgar Keret and Shira Geffen's award-winning Jellyfish, Ella Taylor describes the film as" belonging to a new breed of Israeli movies — domestic rather than political in focus, and formally more sophisticated than the realist war dramas and blunt comedies that until recently kept Israeli cinema in the boondocks of international cinema." As much as I would like to agree with both Tugend and Taylor, I'd be hard pressed to see the non-political in yet another new Israeli production.