Music

Amy Winehouse: Death Of A Soul Singer

The 27 Club is a sad one to be a part of. Full of wasted talent, and names that will live on because of their fall from grace, rather than their immense talent. It’s a shame that Winehouse had to join it. Read More

By / July 25, 2011
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The common, and insensitive, sentiment over the weekend upon hearing about the death of Amy Winehouse (at the very rock and roll dying age of 27), was something along the lines of, “I can’t believe it took this long.”  The singer’s life had gone from massive success with her 2006 smash, Back to Black, to a TMZ-worthy car wreck.

But when all is said and done, I think history will treat Amy Winehouse well.  Aside from the loss of one of the great Jewish soul singers ever (maybe the best?  There really aren’t that many…), historians love stories about doomed R&B/blues singers almost more than they like to talk about the famed “27 Club” that Winehouse now belongs to.  For the generation that grew up with her, Winehouse, her demons, and most importantly, her music, will be mythologized in the same way fellow 27 Clubber Janis Joplin has been.

Either way, the 27 Club is a sad one to be a part of.  It’s full of wasted talent, and names that will live on more because of their fall from grace, less than their immense talent.  It’s a shame that Winehouse had to join it.