Arts & Culture

Goodbye Coffee Cup Man

Not to sound like the closet goth that I am, but New York has just about anywhere else beat in the "Great Obituary Department." A good example would be Leslie Buck.  Born Laszlo Büch, a Czechoslovakian Jew who survived Auschwitz … Read More

By / April 30, 2010

Not to sound like the closet goth that I am, but New York has just about anywhere else beat in the "Great Obituary Department." A good example would be Leslie Buck.  Born Laszlo Büch, a Czechoslovakian Jew who survived Auschwitz and Buchenwald, and would go on to create what his New York Times obituary described as the "enduring piece of ephemera in New York City" — the Anthora coffee cup. There’s a good chance that you’ve seen the cup, which means you’ve seen Mr. Buck’s handwork.  To me, it’s something that’s been instantly recognizable since childhood, but to be completely honest, I never gave much though to the person or persons who may have created it.  The Times summed up the life and work of Mr. Buck in their grand old fashion:

"But given the tenacious traditionalism of many locals ("Avenue of the Americas," anyone?), it is safe to assume that the Anthora and its heirs will endure, at least for a while, in the city’s steadfast precincts. For some time to come, on any given day, somewhere a New Yorker will be cradling the cup, with its crisp design and snug white lid, the stuff of life inside."