Arts & Culture

Etgar Keret’s Unique Portrayal of Israeli Life

The seeming sweetness of Israeli author and auteur Etgar Keret in a phone interview feels startling at first, given his reputation for writing stinging short prose that flies to the heart of the human condition — and then needles it … Read More

By / March 30, 2009

The seeming sweetness of Israeli author and auteur Etgar Keret in a phone interview feels startling at first, given his reputation for writing stinging short prose that flies to the heart of the human condition — and then needles it further by setting it amid the danger and uncertainty of daily life in Israel.

But in conversation, he comes across as being devoted more to his parents — Polish Holocaust survivors — and their legacy, than to his own mounting reputation as Israel’s pre-eminent author of contemporary letters.

Keret, 41, has long identified with his parents, who, both just teens when the Nazi onslaught ended, fled Europe for the Holy Land.

As a child, "I would pretend to be a local, even though I grew up here all my life. I always kind of felt like an extension of them," he says from his home in Tel Aviv.

 

The full interview can be found in the Albany Times-Union. You can read the rest by clicking here.