Arts & Culture

An Ode to a (Now Closed) Kosher/Vegetarian Restaurant in South Florida

We all go through phases.  Two of my own personal favorites were attempting (and inevitably failing) at veganisim, and later, attempting (and again, inevitably failing) to be more religiously observant. When I started eating vegan, I stocked up on t-shirts … Read More

By / August 16, 2010

We all go through phases.  Two of my own personal favorites were attempting (and inevitably failing) at veganisim, and later, attempting (and again, inevitably failing) to be more religiously observant. When I started eating vegan, I stocked up on t-shirts with monkeys in cages that said "Fuck Animal Testing" and others with slogans like "Poison Free."  I’m sure these were probably made by workers in some 3rd world country that got paid seventeen cents an hour to drive gas guzzling trucks.  I went to protest of a circus’ cruel treatment of animals, and got chased away by a gang of clowns.  Mostly, I missed cheese. Trying to get religious was harder.  First there was the fact that I had only recently stopped referring to myself as an "ardent Spinozis" (no joke) and also, I’ve always had a hard time believing in the ‘conventional’ god, that one and only all-powerful dude.  So despite my regular visits to the Chabad center, and my struggle to put on teffilin very morning, I still couldn’t get myself into the right Jew groove.  With all due to respect to vegans and religious people, those lifestyles aren’t for me, and dedicating my life to not eating certain things, or praying three times a day, takes dedication and discipline that I just don’t have. Still, both of my failed experiments do have one thing in common: a restaurant called Sara’s.  And after reading a post on Jewlicious over the weekend, I’m sad to hear that Sara’s is no more, but it seems there is good reason after 33 years of business:

"I do know that my in-laws [owners of Sara's] deserve a break. They deserve to be honored as heroes of the community, and to find a new way to express their creativity in way that affords them more time for their family and for themselves."

Bummer.  I used to go there when I was visiting my carnivorous, traif-eating family.  The South Florida shop was a haven for Jews and vegans alike, and if memory serves me well, it was not only consistently delicious, but also the only place in a strange and suffocating region that actually felt like home.